Anticipation & Risk Financing


 

Start Network supports agencies to analyse the risk of crises, and create a suite of timely, and reliable funding options, to disburse for different types of crises. This will enable NGOs to forecast crises, and access timely funding to reduce the impact of those disasters on communities. 

Sorce and her son Abdallah in the drought-stricken Oromia region of Ethiopia. Credit: UNOCHA/Charlotte Cans

Timely funding for predictable crises


Climate change, inequality, increased urban densities and the nature of today’s conflicts are generating humanitarian crises of increasing complexity and frequency. Despite improvements in our ability to predict the likelihood of disasters, the humanitarian system continues to react as though they are unexpected surprises, responding only after they occur, and then often slowly. 

 

Anticipation & Risk Financing allows humanitarians to be better prepared in advance of humanitarian events by quantifying risks in advance of crises or disasters, pre-positioning funds, and releasing them according to pre-agreed protocols.

 

We are developing new funding instruments that enable humanitarians to mobilise collaboratively, predictably, to manage risks rather than react to crises. These mechanisms are based on:

 

  1. The use of science and data to model and quantify risks in advance in the areas in which we operate;
  2. Working together to pre-plan and pre-cost different crisis response activities needed to support communities;
  3. Pre-positioning funds according to pre-agreed protocols for release, so that when the conditions are met, funding is rapidly released.

 

Programmes

How do we work


  • Our anticipatory funding is disbursed through the Start Fund for small to medium crises, based on dynamic decision-making, meaning that NGOs can act early when they see crises coming.
  • We are using financial tools such as insurance to leverage funding for NGOs, allowing them to protect against the risk of large-scale drought. This involves quantifying risks, planning humanitarian operations, and disbursing funding according to pre-agreed triggers, in a timely and predictable manner.
  • We will be using the learning from these early action innovations to scale and layer a suite of disaster risk financing tools for different types of crises, to ensure that funding can quickly and efficiently be channelled to frontline humanitarian actors.

CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT


Our anticipatory funding is disbursed through the Start Fund for small to medium crises, based on dynamic decision-making, meaning that NGOs can act early when they see crises coming.

Latest


Blog Post

Learn at the 2018 Assembly: Crisis Anticipation Window

Learn how many people have been reached with the Crisis Anticipation Window and how we have been able to act before and disaster struck.

26Nov18

Blog Post

Bangladeshi floods: Looking back to move forward

In July 2016, Bangladesh was hit by one of the worst floods in recent history. What could have been done differently using the forecasts that were issued? Knowing what we know now, how can we better anticipate future floods? What can we learn from this to limit the damage caused by future floods?

29Oct18

Blog Post

Reflections from the FOREWARN bi-annual community meeting

The Start Fund’s biannual FOREWARN meeting in early September was an opportunity for FOREWARN members to both contribute and draw from a collective body of work. As FOREWARN continues to grow, as well as decentralise – connecting forecasters, scientists, risk analysts and humanitarian decision-makers at all levels proved vital.

04Oct18

Blog Post

Mainstreaming Early Action

Every year, numerous predictable risks turn into humanitarian disasters. Whether it’s foreseen pre-election violence, disease outbreaks following floods, or landslides following heavy rains, a lot can be done to mitigate the damage of such threats by acting early.

04Sep18

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Further Information

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