Start Network

THE NETWORK
FOR CHANGE


Leading for change in humanitarian aid

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Featured news


About us

A new era of humanitarian action


Start Network is made up of more than 40 aid agencies across five continents, ranging from large international organisations to national NGOs. Together, our aim is to transform humanitarian action through innovation, fast funding, early action, and localisation.
We're tackling what we believe are the biggest systemic problems that the sector faces - problems including slow and reactive funding, centralised decision-making, and an aversion to change, means that people affected by crises around the world, do not receive the best help fast enough, and needless suffering results.
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Localisation


We believe that a more balanced international aid system, which shifts power to those closest to the front-line, will generate more effective and appropriate responses for people affected by crises.

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New forms of financing


Our pooled funds enable fast and early action to tackle the kind of crises that are often overlooked by other funding mechanisms. Our risk financing pilots are introducing new ways of working that can save even more lives.

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Collective innovation


New ways of working are needed to tackle the challenges we face. By innovating collectively we can share expertise, insights and perspectives to shape a more effective humanitarian system.

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An international network

Today the Start Network extends to over 40 members and their 7000 partner organisations, employing more than a quarter of a million people across 200 countries and territories.
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Latest news

Latest resources

Resource

Crisis Response Summmary: Morocco (alert 15)

Between 1 January and 20 August 2018, some 27,788 migrants have arrived by sea and 4,125 by land from Morocco to Europe in 2018. Doctors of the World, were awarded MERF funding to respond to the needs of over 8,000 migrants in a three month intervention programme.

17Apr19

Resource

Professionalisation, participation and relationships

This paper looks at issues of ethics in humanitarian iunnovation in relation to the Mahali Lab in Amman, Jordan. This reflection piece by Kristin Bergtora Sandvik is the third in a three-part series that explore ethics questions faced by community-centred innovation labs. It is based on her experience as an ethics advisor to DEPP Innovation Labs, a two-year programme that manages labs in four disaster-prone countries. 

10Apr19

Resource

Local culture and everyday practice

This paper looks at translating innovation ‘culture’ into local culture, and innovation ethics into ‘everyday’ practice. This reflection piece by Kristin Bergtora Sandvik is the second in a three-part series that explore ethics questions faced by community-centred innovation labs. It is based on her experience as an ethics advisor to DEPP Innovation Labs, a two-year programme that manages labs in four disaster-prone countries (Bangladesh, Jordan, Kenya and Philippines). 

09Apr19

Resource

Starting the ethical journey

The paper introduces issues of ethics in humanitarian innovation. It is part of a three part series by Kristin Bergtora Sandvik that explore ethics questions faced by community-centred innovation labs.

04Apr19

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The Network

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